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Feminist critic Patricia Melzer writes in Alien Constructions: Science Fiction and Feminist Thought that gynoids in Richard Calder's Dead Girls are inextricably linked to men's lust, and are mainly designed as sex objects, having no use beyond "pleasing men's violent sexual desires".

In the film The Perfect Women, the titular robot, Olga, is described as having "no sex", but Steve Chibnall writes in his essay "Alien Women" in British Science Fiction Cinema that it is clear from her fetishistic underwear that she is produced as a toy for men, with an "implicit fantasy of a fully compliant sex machine".

The term fembot was also used in Buffy the Vampire Slayer (referring to a robot duplicate of the title character, a.k.a. The 1987 science-fiction cult film Cherry 2000 also portrayed a gynoid character which was described by the male protagonist as his "perfect partner".

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More recently, the 2015 science-fiction film Ex Machina featured a genius inventor experimenting with gynoids in an effort to create the perfect companion.

Fiction about gynoids or female cyborgs reinforce essentialist ideas of femininity, according to Margret Grebowicz.

In The Stepford Wives, husbands are shown as desiring to restrict the independence of their wives, and obedient and stereotypical spouses are preferred.

The husbands' technological method of obtaining this "perfect wife" is through the murder of their human wives and replacement with gynoid substitutes that are compliant and housework obsessed, resulting in a "picture-postcard" perfect suburban society.

A gynoid, or fembot, is a humanoid robot that is gendered feminine.

Gynoids appear widely in science fiction film and art.In 1983, a busty female robot named "Sweetheart" was removed from a display at the Lawrence Hall of Science after a petition was presented claiming it was insulting to women.The robot's creator, Clayton Bailey, a professor of art at California State University, Hayward called this "censorship" and "next to book burning." Artificial women have been a common trope in fiction and mythology since the writings of the ancient Greeks.The film's sequels had cameo appearances of characters revealed as fembots.Jack Halberstam writes that these gynoids inform the viewer that femaleness does not indicate naturalness, and their exaggerated femininity and sexuality is used in a similar way to the title character's exaggerated masculinity, lampooning stereotypes.As more realistic humanoid robot design becomes technologically possible, they are also emerging in real-life robot design.

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