Live 121 sex chat - Dating problems

However, from a biblical perspective the earth was created by God on Day 1 of the Creation Week before the sun and the rest of the solar system were created on Day 4, all only about 6000 or so years ago.

Yet the earth would still have had an initial (created) Pb isotopic endowment.

Dating problems-77

Dating problems

The stunning improvements in the performance of mass spectrometers during the past four or so decades, starting with the landmark paper by Wasserburg et al.

(1969), have not been accompanied by any comparable improvement in the accuracy of the decay constants (Begemann et al.

Various methods have been devised to determine this initial or common Pb, but all involve making unprovable assumptions.

Zircon does incorporate initial Pb when it crystallizes. It cannot be proven that the Pb in apparently cogenetic U- or Th-free minerals is only initial Pb, and that it is identical to the initial Pb in the mineral being dated.

Once radioactive decay of U and Th started after creation, daughter Pb isotopes were added inside the earth.

Then catastrophic plate tectonics during the Flood stirred the mantle and via partial melting added new rocks to the crust.The absolute ages provided by the radioisotope dating methods provide an apparent aura of certainty to the claimed millions and billions of years for formation of the earth’s rocks.Many in both the scientific community and the general public around the world thus remain convinced of the earth’s claimed great antiquity.U decay in those rocks added daughter Pb isotopes to the common or initial Pb isotopes in them, inherited from the rock’s sources.So the Pb isotope ratios measured in these rocks today must be interpreted before their U-Pb ages can be calculated.From a creationist perspective, the 1997–2005 RATE (Radioisotopes and the Age of The Earth) project successfully made progress in documenting some of the pitfalls in the radioisotope dating methods, and especially in demonstrating that radioisotope decay rates may not have always been constant at today’s measured rates (Vardiman, Snelling, and Chaffin 2000, 2005).

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